In a recent article in Forbes, MIT Sloan School of Management visiting scientist Mark Trusheim and co-author Peter B. Bach, a physician at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York, propose a startling response to the prevalence of hepatitis C and the high cost of the leading therapy: The U.S. government should not just pay for the pills — they should buy their maker.

The pharmaceutical company Gilead sells hepatitis C drugs that have 80 percent market share at an estimated average cost per patient as high as $42,000 per curative treatment course. In clinical studies it’s shown to halt, and in some cases reverse, liver damage caused by the disease. “In this unique case … there is an intersection of a clear winning therapy, large public health need, slow adoption, high product pricing,” and a solid business case, say the authors.

Read more at MIT News